DRAO Seminar Series Spring 2020


Time & Date Speaker Title
14:00 Wed Jan 08 Paul Scholz
UToronto
Latest results from CHIME/FRB
14:00 Wed Jan 15 Matt Dobbs
McGill
Unlocking the Radio Sky – mapping transients and cosmic structure with CHIME and the path to CHORD
14:00 Wed Jan 29 Tyrone Woods
DAO
Uncovering the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae from clues in the ISM
14:00 Wed Feb 12 Simon Foreman
Perimeter/DRAO
Weak Lensing of 21cm Maps
14:00 Wed Feb 26 Gregg Hallinan
Caltech
TBD
14:00 Wed Mar 4 Chikaedu Ogbodo
Macquarie University
Mapping the Galactic Magnetic Field with Hydroxyl Masers
14:00 Wed Mar 11 Jane Kaczmarek
CSIRO/DRAO
TBD
14:00 Wed Mar 18 Meiling Deng
UBC/DRAO
TBD
14:00 Wed Mar 25 Katie Jameson
CSIRO
TBD
14:00 Wed Apr 8 Judith Irwin
Queen’s University
The CHANG-ES Project and new Results on Polarized Disks and Halos of Galaxies
14:00 Wed Apr 22 Abedin Abedin
DAO
TBD

Latest results from CHIME/FRB

Paul Scholz (UofT)

CHIME/FRB is a search for fast radio bursts using the CHIME telescope at DRAO. As we enter into its second year of operation, several exciting results which help to elucidate the nature of FRBs have come out of CHIME/FRB. I will review the current status of the project and present the latest results, putting them in context in the FRB field.

Unlocking the Radio Sky – mapping transients and cosmic structure with CHIME and the path to CHORD

Matt Dobbs (McGill)

Technology advances have opened a new era of radio observations. We are now monitoring the sky at millisecond cadence and discovering a vast catalog of new fast radio transients while simultaneously making deep maps of structure in the universe using hydrogen intensity mapping as a tracer. While these fields are still in their infancy, early results are rolling out, fuelling discovery and motivating the design for new instruments. I will show recent advances with the CHIME telescope, and describe the path towards developing CHORD, a new generation highly redundant telescope to be sited at DRAO.

Uncovering the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae from clues in the ISM

Tyrone Woods (DAO)

Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have proven vital to our understanding of cosmology, both as standard candles and for their role in the origin of the elements. They are now understood to arise from the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf, but why should a white dwarf explode? Evolutionary models can be grouped into either “accretion” or “merger” scenarios, with accretion models typically implying a hot, luminous phase prior to explosion. These objects are significant sources of ionizing radiation; therefore, the environment surrounding SN Ia progenitors should be strongly ionized, and traced by faint nebular emission. Such “relic” nebulae should extend out to 10 — 100 parsecs and linger for roughly the recombination timescale in the ISM (∼100,000 years). In this talk, I’ll show how the absence of a surrounding nebula excludes any accretion (“single-degenerate”) channel for the origin of Tycho’s supernova, as well as many other nearby remnants. Most variations on the merger (“double degenerate”) scenario remain viable. I’ll also show how a similar test can be applied to the integrated emission of old stellar populations, ruling out the textbook accretion scenario for delay times greater than 1 Gyr, before concluding with some recent results on the deeper connections between binary progenitors of some supernovae and the warm ionized interstellar medium.

Weak Lensing of 21cm Maps

Simon Foreman (Perimeter)

TBD

Gregg Hallinan (Caltech)

Mapping the Galactic Magnetic Field with Hydroxyl Masers

Chikaedu Ogbodo (Macquarie)

TBD

Jane Kaczmarek (CSIRO/DRAO)

TBD

Meiling Deng (UBC/DRAO)

TBD

Katie Jameson (CSIRO)

The CHANG-ES Project and new Results on Polarized Disks and Halos of Galaxies

Judith Irwin (Queen’s University)

TBD

Abedin Abedin (DAO)